lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale
lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale__front

Description

Product Description

In this pioneering new work, celebrated historian David Nasaw examines the life of Joseph P. Kennedy, the founder of the twentieth century''s most famous political dynasty. Drawing on never-before-published materials from archives on three continents and interviews with Kennedy family members and friends, Nasaw tells the story of a man who participated in the major events of his times: the booms and busts, the Depression and the New Deal, two world wars and the Cold War, and the birth of the New Frontier. In studying Kennedy''s life, we relive the history of the American century.

"Riveting . . .  The Patriarch is a book hard to put down . . . As his son indelibly put it some months before his father was struck down: ''Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your county.'' One wonders what was going through the mind of the patriarch, sitting a few feet away listening to that soaring sentiment as a fourth-generation Kennedy became president of the United States. After coming to know him over the course of this brilliant, compelling book, the reader might suspect that he was thinking he had done more than enough for his country. But the gods would demand even more." - New York Times Book Review

Review

One of the New York Times''s Ten Best Books of the Year
One of Kirkus''s Best Nonfiction Books of the Year


*

Riveting…The Patriarch is a book hard to put down…As his son indelibly put it some months before his father was struck down: ‘Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your county.’ One wonders what was going through the mind of the patriarch, sitting a few feet away listening to that soaring sentiment as a fourth-generation Kennedy became president of the United States.  After coming to know him over the course of this brilliant, compelling book, the reader might suspect that he was thinking he had done more than enough for his country.  But the gods would demand even more.” – New York Times Book Review

“David Nasaw’s The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy is the sort of biography that begs to be called ‘magisterial.’Boston Globe

“Mr. Nasaw has the rare ability to see the big picture and frame the detail with careful scholarship -- all the while making room for elements that do not fit -- which in Joe Kennedy''s case is quite a lot…. Mr. Nasaw''s is a literate and searching exposition of the patriarch''s life that offers the reader compelling answers to questions about JPK…. If The Patriarch doesn''t scoop up some serious accolades for the writing of American history, the fix is in.” – Pittsburgh Post Gazette
 

About the Author

David Nasaw is the author of Andrew Carnegie and The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst. He is the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., Professor of History at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
512 global ratings

Reviews with videos

Top reviews from the United States

Clem
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Long book, but not boring nor tedious
Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2019
The Kennedy family is undoubtedly one of the most famous, if not the most famous, family of 20th Century America. Most who even follow the family at a distance know that their story is a harsh one. Even the most skeptical people around are tempted to believe in something... See more
The Kennedy family is undoubtedly one of the most famous, if not the most famous, family of 20th Century America. Most who even follow the family at a distance know that their story is a harsh one. Even the most skeptical people around are tempted to believe in something such as a “family curse” when hearing their family story. This is a very well written, and heavily detailed book on the father, or “patriarch” of the family, Joseph P. Kennedy.

This book was a bit long. Reading on a Kindle, one can’t immediately look at the book and feel intimidated. Had I looked at an actual hardback version of this biography, I might have passed. It probably looked awfully large. We must remember, though, that Joseph Kennedy had an incredibly rich, full life, and such a large compendium is rightly justified. Although I was definitely worn down by the end of the book, I didn’t feel that the writing was long winded nor too detailed.

Although the book (like most biographies) is told in a linear narrative, I felt at many times I was reading multiple biographies. There’s Kennedy the astute successful businessmen, Kennedy the Hollywood producer, Kennedy the ambassador to England, and Kennedy, the father to the famous JFK. Through all of these episodes, we’re constantly also kept in the loop with wife Rose and his nine children. There’s just enough ‘family’ here to keep the reader familiar with all of their comings and goings, but the majority of the focus is on Kennedy’s many different endeavors throughout his lifetime.

I found it interesting that, whereas the book painted the man with a rather favorable brush, I came away with the impression that I really didn’t like the man. Although he worked very hard for his money and rightfully earned his accomplishments, I was left with the impression that he waved his wealth in the face of all of his associates, and those that didn’t step in line with his ambitions or goals were quickly ostracized and demonized by him. I suppose tons of money can do that to one’s character; especially in the times when Kennedy lived.

My favorite part of the book was Kennedy’s tenure as Ambassador to England in the 1930s leading up to World War II. This section of the book could have easily commanded its OWN book. I’ve read many history books on World War II, and the events leading up to it, but it was fascinating to read about it through Joseph Kennedy’s eyes. It was also probably the key reason why I ended up not liking the man. Like many Americans, Kennedy was an isolationist prior the Pearl Harbor bombing, but unlike most, he remained an isolationist throughout the entire war, convinced it was a giant mistake. We read time and time again how Kennedy simply didn’t think England had a fool’s chance to win, and like Neville Chamberlain, he went through hell and highwater to appease Hitler to keep the war from expanding; even without the US being involved. When one reads between the lines, one gets the impression that Kennedy was more interested in protecting his wealth than he was stopping a maniacal dictator from trying to take over the world.

Of course, one must not treat the man too harshly when his oldest son, Joe Jr. was killed during the same war that Kennedy vociferously opposed while on a secret bombing mission. Most know that Joe Jr’s death would be the first of four of Kennedy’s children tragically killed, in addition to another child reduced to a vegetative state after a failed lobotomy. So as rich and powerful as he was, he definitely didn’t have an easy go of things.

Still, it seemed as though Kennedy comes across as a rich arrogant aristocrat who simply jumps up and down and pouts when others don’t see things his way. During his tenure as Ambassador to England, we read multiple instances of clashes between Kennedy and President Franklin Roosevelt. Powerful men create uncontrollably powerful egos.

Kennedy does come across as a caring head-of-the family, always making time for each of his nine children, but at the same time seems to want to spend more time making gobs of money than having family excursions. Throughout most of the book, we read that wife Rose goes on multiple cross-continent vacations either by herself, or with some of the brood; but never with her husband. Kennedy seems to want to be more of a ‘responsible father’ as opposed to a ‘loving dad’. When such pressures are put on one by their parents, you can’t help but wonder if things were more disjointed behind the scenes than what is revealed here. Sadly, Kennedy is quite the womanizer and seems to spend much more time away from wife Rose that he does with her. Rose seems resigned to her destiny, and we rarely hear her complain. I guess this was the norm for the rich and powerful back then. Maybe it still is, I don’t know. It seems like many people today still can’t differentiate ‘success’ from ‘happiness’.

When second (now eldest) son Jack enters politics, Kennedy makes his son’s political future another one of his personal ambitions. It’s no secret that Jack is very successful in all of his efforts; all the way up to being President of the U.S.A. Although this book barely mentions the shady speculative innuendos that are largely hinted at elsewhere, you definitely come away with the impression that Kennedy’s money and influence is the main factor that escalates Jack into the White House at such a young age. Even when his son becomes President, Dad can’t help but pout.
Apparently he was disgusted that his son won the election by such a narrow margin, and again rants and raves at all of those that he feels were responsible.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I began reading this. Due to many unscrupulous rumors around the double life of Joseph Kennedy, I wouldn’t have been surprised had this thing been a full-scale slinger of mud. In hindsight, I’m glad it wasn’t. The author seems biased to the good side of his character, yet after finishing the book, I came away with the impression that I admired Joseph Kennedy’s accomplishments, but can’t really say I admire him as a person or a husband.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
K. Weinstein
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Naive narration
Reviewed in the United States on November 14, 2013
This book reads like a classic example of naïve narration: a slew of facts and description, followed by a general statement of interpretation that precisely contradicts the preceding facts. Naïve narration can be a brilliant literary technique - think Huckleberry Finn -... See more
This book reads like a classic example of naïve narration: a slew of facts and description, followed by a general statement of interpretation that precisely contradicts the preceding facts. Naïve narration can be a brilliant literary technique - think Huckleberry Finn - but unless the author intends the reader to interpret his statements as sarcastic, it does not have a place in biography.

Here''s an example, from page 759: "[Jack] did not want to disappoint his father [on the subject of Bobby as attorney general], and just as important, past experiences had proven that more often than not Joseph P. Kennedy knew what he was talking about." This statement follows several hundred pages in which Joseph P. Kennedy:
1. Argues that Britain will fall immediately if it tries to fight Germany (while the ambassador to Britain)
2. Pushes Britain and the US to reach a negotiated settlement with Germany well into 1941
3. Continues to argue even after 1945 it was the wrong decision for the Allies to fight in WWII
4. Believes Joseph McCarthy is a good guy and the only reason he overstepped is because Roy Cohn was on his team instead of Bobby Kennedy
5. Encourages Jack to sue a TV network for negative statements (instead they got a quiet retraction and the issue died down)
6. Determines the best course for his mentally retarded but functional and happy daughter is a new and radical brain surgery
7. Gives incoherent and contradictory speeches on foreign policy that get him shunned by the Roosevelt and Truman administrations despite his financial contributions and influence

This is a man who, whatever else you want to say about him, emphatically did not know what he was talking about for much of the last 3 decades of his life.

Similarly, we read that nothing was as important to Kennedy as his children and family, immediately after we''ve learned that he decamped Hyannis Port to vacation alone in Palm Beach and play golf with his buddies whenever the house got crowded, which was preceded by a tiresome and gossipy description of the semi-celebrities and twentysomething French girls he slept with and wrote love letters to during one of his solo trips to Europe. Reading the book I would be hard-pressed to guess how much time each year he actually spent in the same place as his children, but wouldn''t be shocked if it was less than a month.

As another reviewer notes, it is perhaps unfair to compare any author to Robert Caro. But when you read the amazing "Years of Lyndon Johnson," the dramatic contradictions between LBJ''s actions and beliefs across time - his pettiness and his generosity, his bullying ambition and his lack of self-confidence - are spelled out, if not resolved, in compelling fashion. I sense that the story and character of Joseph Kennedy has some similarities: he really did care about his children and his choice to push them toward public service rather than further financial success was remarkable, but the author scarcely acknowledges the contradiction between caring deeply about his children and spending months alone on vacation. By any reasonable definition, despite the author''s protestation to the contrary Kennedy''s actions and statements were anti-Semitic, but I sense that there was more to his push against entering WWII or accepting refugees to the U.S. - paranoia? Fear for his children''s lives? I wanted to understand Kennedy, and after 800 pages I don''t. To make the Caro comparison one more time, his 1-chapter mini-bio of JFK gave me more insight than this book-length treatment of the father. And a few childhood anecdotes about LBJ -- writing his full name in 4-foot-high letters on the blackboard at school when he was leaving to go to the bathroom, refusing to let other kids play with his baseball unless they let him pitch -- are more vivid a year after I read that book than any detail from The Patriarch, which I finished today.

Part of the problem is that the main source is Kennedy''s own letters, which of course are not a reliable portrayal of his thoughts and motivations. Caro interviewed seemingly everyone who interacted with LBJ and thus had tremendous insight from multiple perspectives, but Kennedy''s contemporaries were gone before this book was written so Nasaw did not have a similar opportunity.

If you view the book as a well-edited selection of Kennedy''s more significant letters (and skim the author''s commentary), it''s a success. As a biography, it''s a failure.
39 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
JMC
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
a Good book and in depth information on a very controversial person
Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2015
The book does provide a good look at Joseph Kennedy and in total I believe has balance. The author refrains from making any critical comments and does seem sympathetic to the Kennedy family. There have always been countless accusations in the media about Joseph Kennedy and... See more
The book does provide a good look at Joseph Kennedy and in total I believe has balance. The author refrains from making any critical comments and does seem sympathetic to the Kennedy family. There have always been countless accusations in the media about Joseph Kennedy and like any individual that made a large amount of money in a short period of time you can find fault with his morals and business ethics and I think this book leaves you to form your own opinion. I would have rated it much higher if the author would have left out a lot of the tremendous detail he goes into on several sections that could have easily been presented in a more concise fashion. A good book if you are interested in Kennedy history.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
TheFranimal
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well-Researched, But Lacking Some Analysis
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2013
I have to say, I had no idea Joseph P. Kennedy (JPK) had such an amazing career. I had a general idea of how much money he made and that he had amassed some serious political clout and connections in his lifetime, but before his kids ever hit the political scene, he was... See more
I have to say, I had no idea Joseph P. Kennedy (JPK) had such an amazing career. I had a general idea of how much money he made and that he had amassed some serious political clout and connections in his lifetime, but before his kids ever hit the political scene, he was making his mark in a variety of industries. He was in banking, trading, film distribution, politics, liquor importation, the Merchandise Mart, philanthropy, and more. It was pretty amazing to find out all he had done - even if it took me 800 pages to find out about it. The "remarkable life" part of the title really captures it.

Things I learned about JPK that I didn''t know before I read the book:

He chaired the first SEC
He may have pushed his children hard, but he was their biggest supporter - they turned to him when they needed to be cheered up
He was a terrible ambassador
He and his wife, Rose, spent more time apart then they did together during their marriage, but that seemed to suit them both

The Patriarch is meticulously researched - Nasaw relies heavily on primary sources, as any good historian should. My issue with this book is that he presents the historical records but offers very little analysis or insight into JPK''s motivation. Nasaw offers very little speculation about why JPK was the person he was. It seemed like the available primary sources for JPK''s childhood were pretty slim, so there is not much attention paid to that time of his life, but I''m guessing that played a big role in shaping who he was. Nassaw also did very little to address some of the well-known rumors about JPK because there isn''t much on the historical record to prove or refute them. For example, he gives JPK''s potential time as a bootlegger about a paragraph of attention at the end of a chapter and basically says, "There is no evidence that he did that." Well, right - there is very little evidence that anyone was a bootlegger or speakeasy operator, but how did that rumor pop up and why does it persist? Some insight into that issue would have told the reader a lot about JPK and his place in the American landscape.

I wonder if Nasaw swings so hard towards the historical record because there is so much speculation and rumor about the Kennedy family? As annoyed as I got with his repeated, "Well, there''s no evidence he did that" explanations, at the same time I was thinking that it would be nice to read a book about John F. Kennedy that was less hysterical or fawning and more analytical.

Anyways, overall, this was an interesting, albeit long, read. JPK was such an interesting person and lived such a varied life - it''s hard not to be fascinated. And getting the background on how the Kennedy family got its start provides some additional insight into everything they''ve done (right or wrong) since then.

In a nutshell: As a history buff, I thought this was a good read, but it might not be the best pick for someone who has a passing interest in biographies - get ready for 800 pages of meticulous research, followed by 150 pages of footnotes. Three and a half stars.
17 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
RCTNYC
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Learned About the Times and the Man
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2012
I hesitated to buy this book, because I knew about Kennedy''s clashes with Roosevelt and Churchill during the Second World War, and willingness to negotiate with Hitler, and such behavior and attitudes were repugnant to me. Nonetheless, I can''t resist a good, long,... See more
I hesitated to buy this book, because I knew about Kennedy''s clashes with Roosevelt and Churchill during the Second World War, and willingness to negotiate with Hitler, and such behavior and attitudes were repugnant to me. Nonetheless, I can''t resist a good, long, well-researched biography, particularly about someone who, like Kennedy, played an important role in the New Deal. I was pleasantly surprised to find this biography to be objective, informative and no hagiography. While the author clearly does not dislike Kennedy, he pulls no punches in describing Kennedy''s defeatist, concessionary attitudes, not merely at the outset, but during the early years of the War. In addition, however, because the author is a good historian, he provides us with a basis on which to understand the conflicting opinions that prevailed at the time as to what was in Britain''s and the US''s long-term interests, as well Kennedy''s reasons, both personal and political, for believing, as he did, that victory over Hitler, whom he despised as a dictator, was impossible.

Time and time again, Kennedy was wrong. Yet we learn in this bio that he was no Nazi-sympathizer. Instead, he was a businessman and congenital pessimist who did not understand the moral and political consequence of appeasement. He was also, it appears, an anti-Semite who blamed Jews for escalating the conflict with Hitler -- unbelievable, but that''s what he thought -- even as he tried to persuade a reluctant Roosevelt and Chamberlain to pressure Hitler to allow Jews to leave Germany for safer ground.

The story of the Kennedy family has been told over and over again, and of course plays a central role in this biography. Despite his infidelities, Kennedy appears to have loved his wife, Rose, and adored his children. His marriage was odd, to say the least -- the couple spent little time together -- but both parties to the deal seemed to have been content. Moving is the account of what happened to Rosemary, the Kennedy''s mildly retarded daughter, who fell victim to medical science and her father''s attempt to help her.

I would have liked to learn more about Kennedy''s involvement with the Truman administration and Cold War politics; the depiction of that period is a bit dry, lacking the drama and detail of the sections devoted to the Depression and Second World War. Nonetheless, this biography is a winner, and has increased my understanding of a complex man who played an important role in the history of the last century.
11 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Mal Warwick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An outstanding biography of Joe Kennedy, who helped shaped the world we live in
Reviewed in the United States on February 2, 2015
Joe Kennedy was a piece of work. The men in public life he admired the most were Neville Chamberlain, Herbert Hoover, and J. Edgar Hoover. He deeply distrusted FDR, Winston Churchill, George Marshall, and Harry Truman. He campaigned strenuously against military... See more
Joe Kennedy was a piece of work.

The men in public life he admired the most were Neville Chamberlain, Herbert Hoover, and J. Edgar Hoover. He deeply distrusted FDR, Winston Churchill, George Marshall, and Harry Truman. He campaigned strenuously against military action to resist Hitler and, later, Stalin and his successors. “He was perfectly consistent,” writes David Nasaw in his compelling biography. “He saw communism in the forties as he had seen Nazism in the thirties — as a detestable system but not as a mortal threat to American security.”

Though widely condemned as a bootlegger, Kennedy never had any connection with illegal sales of alcohol, though he later became the nation’s largest salesman of legal Scotch whiskey. Nor did he have the “Mob ties” that he was so frequently accused of having. He was a notorious short-seller on Wall Street who amassed a fortune betting against the American economy as it spiraled into Depression, yet he became the first chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission and was universally praised for getting the SEC into operation in record time and satisfying both the New Dealers and the bankers. Still serving as FDR’s Ambassador to the UK though awaiting replacement at home, he campaigned coast to coast for accommodation to Hitler, predicting certain defeat for the British — after they had already won the Battle of Britain and prevented the launch of a planned Nazi invasion. Prone to anti-Semitic remarks from time to time, and paranoid about Jewish influence in the media and politics, he was nonetheless a pugnacious and persistent advocate for resettling Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany — first, in Palestine, and later in the US, Great Britain, and elsewhere in the British Empire. And, yes, some of his best friends were Jews. Despite FDR’s intense distrust of the man, he kept Kennedy as US Ambassador in London for years because he feared the man would oppose his seeking a third term in 1940. He was a proud family man, idolized by his wife and nine children despite extended absences during which he carried out long-lasting affairs with married women, including movie star Gloria Swanson and Congresswoman and later Ambassador Clare Booth Luce.

This was the man who fathered John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, as well as two other leading candidates for the office. His life was the stuff of classical tragedy, not Shakespearean but Greek in its primal ferocity. He lost his oldest daughter to a botched lobotomy in 1941, his oldest son to a suicide mission in World War II, another daughter to a plane crash shortly afterwards, and two sons to assassination in the 1960s. Though he never held public office higher than that of SEC Chairman and Ambassador to England, he was one of the most influential people of his time, alternately revered and reviled. As much as any single person, Joe Kennedy shaped the studio system that dominated Hollywood for decades. In 1957, The New York Times named him as one of the fifteen richest men in the country, with a fortune then estimated by Forbes that was the equivalent of billions of dollars today.

The Patriarch is a very big book, crammed with rich details that emerged from the author’s painstaking research. For any student of twentieth century American history, this outstanding biography illuminates the eight-decade span of our country’s emergence from scrappy industrial powerhouse to superpower, encompassing the Progressive era, two world wars, the Great Depression, and the tensest years of Cold War. Inevitably, Nasaw covers a lot of familiar territory, but in his comprehensive treatment of the life of this one truly extraordinary man, he paints a vivid picture of the United States in the twentieth century.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Senex Magister
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Patriarch
Reviewed in the United States on April 2, 2016
I really can''t give words to a review deserving of this book on Joseph Patrick Kennedy. There is much good as well as bad that could be said about his life. He was a man who was successful as a businessman and his public life, I am sure, will continue to be debated as... See more
I really can''t give words to a review deserving of this book on Joseph Patrick Kennedy. There is much good as well as bad that could be said about his life. He was a man who was successful as a businessman and his public life, I am sure, will continue to be debated as long as we try to tread that road between war and peace. I am not an apologist for Joseph Kennedy but he was responsible for a political evolution within his family and especially his sons. He knew suffering and tragedy beyond the scope of most of us. This is the second biography by David Nasaw that I have read already having read his book on Andrew Carnegie. Both are excellent. Yet, this book holds a tale of personal greatness and failure in the context of a humanity where this man always attempted to do what he believed was right for family and nation. It is a story that still has much to say to us.
4 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
TJG
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great biography of the Kennedy family starting point
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2012
I first took Patriarch out from the library, to see if it was worth buying. After less than 200 pages into it, I decided it definitely was, ordered it, and received it from Amazon this week. This is a very readable book, interesting and informative and not at all pedantic... See more
I first took Patriarch out from the library, to see if it was worth buying. After less than 200 pages into it, I decided it definitely was, ordered it, and received it from Amazon this week. This is a very readable book, interesting and informative and not at all pedantic like some biographies. I read the one-star reviews here, and find them uniformly ridiculous. Complaining about the price is not a review of a book. If you can''t afford to buy books, then get a library card. If you don''t like the subject of a biography, then you are not going to have many biographies to read. Joseph Kennedy, like him or dislike him, is an important enough historical figure by himself, and this book very adequately tells about who he was, where he came from, and his mindset and his motivations. The Kennedy family is huge in modern American politics. Joe''s children included three senators, one of whom became president, one attorney general, two assassinated. His daughters were strong leaders. A son-in-law was vice-presidential candidate in 1972. Several of Joe''s grandchildren have carried on the legacy of public service and politics. This book is about where that started. Come on--aren''t you interested in how the Kennedy wealth came to be and how a person who had generated such wealth was able to sidestep the market collapse of the Depression and retain it? I found that fascinating. Equally, his connections with FDR, and frustrations, and how he ultimately came to be an ambassador. And got it wrong about Nazi Germany (as well as Chamberlain.) Triumphs, tragedies, and flaws, philandering, and loyalty. In 800 pages you do find out who this guy was. My only wish is that there were more pictures. In any case, this book solidly merits a five-star review. I cannot helpo but think that the one-starrers wrote theirs whining about the price of the Kindle version just to bring the average down. That is far friom an ethical way to review, in my book, and I think Amazon would be better served by deleting those reviews. They have nothing to do with the fine biographical work that Nasaw produced.
13 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Murphy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Joe
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 28, 2020
I wish I had read this book before any other `s pertaining to the Kennedy`s. This book suggests there was never any link or friendships with organised crime or assistance in vote fraud also it is very hard to believe Kennedy (snr) being a self made man needed anything from...See more
I wish I had read this book before any other `s pertaining to the Kennedy`s. This book suggests there was never any link or friendships with organised crime or assistance in vote fraud also it is very hard to believe Kennedy (snr) being a self made man needed anything from the mob. Yes he clearly used his money to pave the political way for his children but any wealthy parent would do the same. His only crime in my eyes was with daughter Rosemary, who should never have been lobotomised but I also believe his stroke leaving him without speech must have made him realise Rosemary`s outcome. A very factual and true account of this remarkable but cursed family. Reading between the lines it is fairly obvious the demise of Jack and Bobby was the CIA but I wouldn''t be surprised if the Vatican was involved.
Report
R Helen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An intriguing look at the head of America''s most influential family
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 2, 2014
I must say, I didn''t expect to like this book as much as I did. I think, being Jewish, Joseph Kennedy has always been, in my mind, the Nazi sympathizing, antisemitic head of one of America''s most famous and influential families. Nasaw, however, has spent a large part of...See more
I must say, I didn''t expect to like this book as much as I did. I think, being Jewish, Joseph Kennedy has always been, in my mind, the Nazi sympathizing, antisemitic head of one of America''s most famous and influential families. Nasaw, however, has spent a large part of this book examining Kennedy''s time as Ambassador to the Court of St. James, his views on appeasement, Hitler, and Jews, in general. According to him, Kennedy wasn''t so much a Nazi sympathizer, as he was a strong believer that for America''s sake it was better to work with Hitler, than against him. Nasaw spends some time emphasizing that Kennedy did not agree with the Nazi regime and especially its overly enthusiastic discrimination of Jews. He brings as proof a letter his son Joe Jr. wrote, in which Joe Jr praises the Nazis and condones their treatment of Jews (p.200), whereby Kennedy agrees with his son''s analysis yet responds that the treatment of the Jews is a little too excessive. Nasaw also shows many places where Kennedy tried to help Jewish refugees, yet at the same time he points out that Kennedy didn''t really spend much time or thought on it, as he felt there were much more important issues to worry about. In my mind, it seems, the author is attempting to reshape our conventional understanding of Kennedy, but I''m not so sure he''s been that successful. Kennedy definitely shared some fascist beliefs, which the author doesn''t delve much into, and he was definitely no fan of Jews. Putting these together, I''m not sure Kennedy has been totally cleared of these labels, but it seems there is definitely a lot more to think about. That said, two of Kennedy''s children asked Nasaw to write the book, so although he denies this affected his research, I think it would definitely shape the way he portrays their father. The author has obviously brushed over some of the more negative aspects of Kennedy''s life. For example, at Bethlehem Steel he apparently caused a huge strike and was forced into a lesser position, despite the achievements Nasaw points out. And his homelife wasn''t so simple either. Rose clearly was much more aware of his womanizing than the author lets on and she even left him for a bit before her father convinced her to return. As for the book itself, the writing is very good, although I enjoyed the political and personal bits much more than the business sections, and I truly felt sorry for the man who eventually lost four children and who never visited his eldest daughter again after the early 1940s. It was very intriguing to hear how his foundation spent so much money on behalf of retarded children, an issue that was plainly dear to his heart, yet he could never bring himself to visit his daughter in the years after her failed lobotomy. Kennedy was a complex, intriguing figure. There were many things to like about him, and a great many more things not to, but his biography is well worth a read.
4 people found this helpful
Report
The Reader
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Biography
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 2, 2016
Very well written book. I am always drawn to biographies written by historians as they tend to be the most informative. This one is no exception. Nasaw delves incredible detail and has written a book that is well worth the read. His views are largely invisible throughout...See more
Very well written book. I am always drawn to biographies written by historians as they tend to be the most informative. This one is no exception. Nasaw delves incredible detail and has written a book that is well worth the read. His views are largely invisible throughout the book in an attempt to just paint the picture without judgement. Things have most likely changed nowadays but it is amazing how well you can understand someone by their personal hand-written letters. Emails are just not the same
2 people found this helpful
Report
Max
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
some questionable material but overall a winner
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 16, 2018
thoroughly enjoyed this book, being interested in Joe Kennedy for years. some facts were a little hazy and are certainly arguable but overall this is a great read.
One person found this helpful
Report
murray
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 15, 2018
excellent,reading
One person found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 12 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • kennedy family books

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale

lowest The Patriarch: The Remarkable outlet online sale Life and Turbulent discount Times of Joseph P. Kennedy outlet online sale